Upcoming Screenings

Hale County This Morning, This Evening
July 17th, 2019

Hale County This Morning, This Evening
Wednesday, July 17th, 2019 / 7:00pm
Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Arts Center


2018 / 76 minutes / English / Color
Directed by: RaMell Ross

Please join Cultivate Cinema Circle as we co-present Squeaky Wheel’s summer film series entitled Three Storms for Summer Eves. We continue with RaMell Ross’s Oscar-nominated documentary Hale County This Morning, This Evening [2018].

Ticket Information: $7 general, $5 members, Free for ArtsAccess pass holders


Event Sponsors:


Market Arcade Complex (first floor)
617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203


Synopsis

courtesy of Cinema Guild:

An inspired and intimate portrait of a place and its people, Hale County This Morning, This Evening looks at the lives of Daniel Collins and Quincy Bryant, two young African American men from rural Hale County, Alabama, over the course of five years. Collins attends college in search of opportunity while Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son in an open-ended, poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives. The audience is invited to experience the mundane and monumental, birth and death, the quotidian and the sublime. These moments combine to communicate the region’s deep culture and provide glimpses of the complex ways the African American community’s collective image is integrated into America’s visual imagination.

In his directorial debut, award-winning photographer and director RaMell Ross offers a refreshingly direct approach to documentary that fills in the gaps between individual black male icons. Hale County This Morning, This Evening allows the viewer an emotive impression of the Historic South, trumpeting the beauty of life and consequences of the social construction of race, while simultaneously offering a testament to dreaming despite the odds.

Director Bio

courtesy of website:

RaMell Ross is a filmmaker, photographer and writer. His photographs have been exhibited around the world and in the US most recently at a solo exhibition at Aperture Foundation in New York and in the landmark exhibition “New Southern Photography” at the Ogden Museum in New Orleans. His writing has appeared in such outlets as The New York Times, Film Quarterly and the Walker Arts Center. In 2015, he was selected as one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” and as a New Frontier Artist in Residence at the MIT Media Lab. In 2016, he was a finalist for the Aperture Portfolio Prize, winner of an Aaron Siskind Individual Photographer’s Fellowship and a Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow. In 2017, he was selected for Rhode Island Foundation’s Robert and Margaret Maccoll Johnson Artist Fellowship. RaMell’s debut feature documentary HALE COUNTY THIS MORNING, THIS EVENING won a Special Jury Prize for Creative Vision at its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2018 and has since gone on to secure international theatrical, broadcast and streaming distribution as well as garnering multiple awards at top tier film festivals. The film was nominated for two IDA awards and five Cinema Eye Honors. The film won the Gotham Award for Best Documentary and the Cinema Eye Honor for Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking and is now nominated for the ICS, Independent Spirit Award and DGA Documentary Award. RaMell is currently on faculty at Brown University’s Visual Arts Department and recently completed his first short film, EASTER SNAP, which is premiering at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival.

Links

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White Material
July 18th, 2019

White Material
Thursday, July 18th, 2019 / 7:00pm
Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center


2010 / 106 minutes / French with English subtitles / Color
Directed by: Claire Denis
Print supplied by: the Swank Films

Please join Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center as we present a year-long series entitled Post-Colonialisms: World Cinema and Human Consequence. We continue with Claire Denis’ critically-acclaimed White Material [2010].

Ticket Information: $8 general, $6 students & seniors, $5 members


Event Sponsors:


341 Delaware Ave, Buffalo, NY 14202


Trailer

Synopsis

courtesy of press kit:

“No more smirking. We’re stopping the bullshit right now and staying put.”

The regular army is preparing to re-establish order in the country. To clean up. To eliminate the rebel officer also known as The Boxer and rid the countryside of roving child soldiers.

All the expatriates have gone home, getting out before things turn nasty.

Of the Vials – coffee planters who have lived here for two generations – Maria stands firm. She’s not about to give in to rumors or abandon her harvest at the first sound of gunfire.

Just like her father-in-law and her ex-husband who is also the father of her son (a little too much of a slacker in her opinion) she is convinced that Cherif, mayor of the neighboring town, will protect them. If she asks him, he will save the plantation. He has a personal guard, a private militia of tough guys, heavily armed and well trained.

Director Statement

courtesy of press kit:

Had I burdened it with all the intentions I wanted, this film would have sunk like an overladen container ship. Luckily, at every stage – from the writing with Marie, to the location scouting, to the shoot –
at every stage we jettisoned them.

It remains, nonetheless, the conduit of a primitive, visceral obsession – fortitude struggling against lassitude, against slackness.

I’d like to dedicate this film to Sony Labou Tansi for his novels, his plays, for the Rocado Zulu Theatre Company, for his struggle against rotten luck.

He said, “We didn’t invent the wheel. We handled that which is found only in the great works of poetry – the sap of the world.” (Les Yeux du Volcan)

Director Bio

“Even if it’s the dream of a voyage, I think it was very important for me that the film offer the two sides of the globe.”

courtesy of The European Graduate School:

Claire Denis (b. 1948) is a Paris-based filmmaker and one of the major artistic voices of contemporary French cinema. After studying economics, Claire Denis enrolled in the Institut des hautes études cinématographiques (now École nationale supérieure des métiers de l’image et du son) where she graduated in 1971. At the beginning of her film career, she worked as an assistant director to Dušan Makavejev, Costa Gavras, Jacques Rivette, Jim Jarmusch, and Wim Wenders.

Denis has developed a highly individualistic style, favoring visual and sound elements over dialogue, and her editing technique has been compared to jazz improvisation for its rhythmic quality. She refuses to conform to narratives and structures of classical cinema, nor to psychological realism and scenic continuity, thus often blurring the border between dreams and reality. Her films are often based on non-subjective memories and intertextual references to literature and other films. In terms of subject matter, Denis’s films show a deep affection and solidarity with marginalized characters usually absent from mainstream cinema (immigrants, exiles, alienated individuals, sexual transgressives), simultaneously questioning prejudices of the dominant white European culture and its myth of progress. One of the main components of her films is the accompanying music. Her distinctive use of pop songs and musical themes is a result of frequent collaborations with the pianist and composer Abdullah Ibrahi and with the British band Tindersticks. Claire Denis is also considered to be one of the representatives of the “New French Extremity,” a term coined by James Quandt to designate transgressive films made by French directors at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Born in Paris, Claire Denis spent her childhood and formative years traveling across Africa due to her father’s career as a colonial administrator and his interest in teaching his children about the importance of geography. This experience formed the basis for her interest in national identity and the legacy of French colonialism, which was translated into her first film Chocolat (1988), a non-biographical account of post-colonialism. The film begins with a white French woman in her late twenties named France who is returning to Cameroon to visit her childhood home. During a car ride with two strangers, Mungo Park and his son, the film flashes back to her childhood in the colonial outpost. Here, we are introduced to Protée, a local domestic worker patiently serving the needs of France’s parents and their ill-mannered guests. The film relies on visual rather than verbal elements to explain interracial tensions and conflicts and to illustrate the intermingling of power relations and desire. The interactions between members of the household are charged with sexual longing, yet the complicity of their relations is revealed to be based on an inferiorization of the local inhabitants. The film ends with Mungo’s failed attempt to read the future from France’s palm, which is too scarred by burns, and with his refusal to have a drink with her following the pattern of interracial relations established in the flashback. With this ending, Claire Denis seems to suggest that not much has changed in post-colonial Cameroon.

After her debut, Claire Denis made a documentary about the first French tour of the Cameroon band Les Têtes Brulées, entitled Man No Run (1989). She continued to explore post-colonial attitudes in her next feature, S’en fout la mort / No Fear, No Die (1990). This claustrophobic and grainy film tells the story of two men, one from Benin and one from the Caribbean, living on the margins of French society. They become involved in an illegal cock-fighting ring, and the experience depicted is one of cultural displacement and racial conflict. Denis explored these themes further in J’ai Pas Sommeil / I Can’t Sleep (1994), portraying the cultural and familial tensions affecting several immigrants in Paris while the city is in the grip of a serial killer.

In one of her most successful films to date, Nénette et Boni / Nenette and Boni (1996), Denis deepens her dissection of family relations. The film is a coming-of-age drama about a lovelorn brother and his pregnant teenage sister recovering from their mother’s suicide. Claire Denis’s international breakthrough came with her next film, Beau Travail / Good Work (1999), based loosely on Herman Melville’s novella Billy Budd, Sailor. The story focuses on a group of French legionnaires stationed in Djibouti and observes the rituals of male bonding and codes of repression as displayed in this homosocial, militarized environment. At the center of the film is the extremely antagonistic, and at the same time erotic, relationship between a sergeant, Galoup, and a new recruit, Gilles. The film’s sensual focus is clearly fixed upon the male body as well as its movements and gestures, and many critics underlined Claire Denis’s talent in replacing Melville’s verbosity with a silence that speaks more than words.

In 2001, Claire Denis shocked Cannes audiences with Trouble Every Day, an exploration of the violent poetics of desire, featuring Vincent Gallo and Beatrice Dalle as carriers of a blood-hungry virus released by erotic stimulation. The plot follows a young American couple on honeymoon in Paris, where the husband takes part in a secret experiment by an unorthodox doctor. Although considered to be the film in which Denis came closest to making a horror film, it simultaneously blurred the lines between high and low genres. The scenes of sexual cannibalism examine our society’s violence of desire as well as our anxieties about science and its ethics.

With Vendredi soir / Friday Night (2002), Denis tells the story of an intimate relationship between two strangers who meet during a public transportation strike. A man and a woman engage in a passionate one-night stand, during which the communication between the two occurs through a mere glance. The result is a sensual, ravishing visual experience told through a series of non-voyeuristic images of their bodies.

L’Intrus / The Intruder (2004) was nominated for a Golden Lion at the 2004 Venice Film Festival and represents, according to many, Denis’s most mysterious and invigorating work. The film takes inspiration from the works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Paul Gauguin’s paintings, and a memoir by French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy, from whom she borrowed the title and the motif of a heart transplant. The story follows an enigmatic man in his late sixties as he travels across the South Seas in an attempt to find a son he has never met—and a new heart. The result is a poetic, dreamlike experience as this “heartless” man and his new acquaintance, an equally mysterious Russian woman, search for signs of home amidst the borderlands inhabited by aliens and natives, intruders and guests.

According to Claire Denis, the inspiration for her film 35 rhums / 35 Shots of Rum (2008) came from her mother’s relationship with her Brazilian father, while on a formal level it represents a homage to the Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu. The story focuses on a widowed father and his grown-up daughter who is supposed to be starting a life and family of her own. The film seems to be in flux, relying mostly on faces and bodies to depict feelings that are impossible to verbalize. Its focus is on the integrity of a small family unit of two surrounded by a network of outsiders trying to break in. At the crucial moment, the resolution comes with the daughter’s decision to act instead of remaining a passive participant in the flow of life.

Returning to Cameroon, Matériel Blanc / White Material (2009), is Denis’s film scripted by the novelist Marie NDiaye. It depicts the members of a white family in present-day Cameroon, surrounded by unrest and rebellion, who are trying to save their coffee plantation while seemingly blind to the new power constellation established in the outside world. Denis’s most recent film, Les Salauds (2013), a “neo-noir” that, through dense and atmospheric fragments, follows a ship captain’s (Vincent Lindon) return to Paris to unravel the tragedy of his brother-in-law’s suicide, and take revenge. The film’s depth is palpable all the while maintaining its surfaces, and surface tension, in order to find its cracks. Denis has also recently filmed a few film shorts, To the Devil (2011) and Voilà l’enchaînement (2014), and, as one of seventy renowned film directors, contributed a documentary short on the future of cinema to the documentary Venice 70: Future Reloaded (2013).

Links

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Endless Dreams and Water Between
August 14th, 2019

Endless Dreams and Water Between
Wednesday, August 14th, 2019 / 7:00pm
Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Arts Center


2009 / 70 minutes / English / Color
Directed by: Renée Green

Please join Cultivate Cinema Circle as we co-present Squeaky Wheel’s summer film series entitled Three Storms for Summer Eves. We continue with Renée Green’s Endless Dreams and Water Between [2009].

Ticket Information: $7 general, $5 members, Free for ArtsAccess pass holders


Event Sponsors:


Market Arcade Complex (first floor)
617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203


Trailer


Synopsis

courtesy of website:

Renée Green’s Endless Dreams and Water Between is a feature film with four fictitious characters sustaining an epistolary exchange in which their “planetary thought” is woven with the physical locations they inhabit: the island of Manhattan, the island of Majorca, in Spain, and the islands and peninsula that form the San Francisco Bay Area. Connected through ruminations on the 17th century author George Sand (Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin), the characters’ reflections and dreams enact what could be described as “an archipelagic mind,” linking worlds, time, and space.

Director Bio

courtesy of MIT:

Professor Renée Green is an artist, filmmaker and writer. Via films, essays and writings, installations, digital media, architecture, sound-related works, film series and events her work engages with investigations into circuits of relation and exchange over time, the gaps and shifts in what survives in public and private memories as well as what has been imagined and invented. She also focuses on the effects of a changing transcultural sphere on what can now be made and thought.

Her exhibitions, videos and films have been seen throughout the world in museums, biennales and festivals.

Since her arrival at MIT in 2011, Green has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House, Los Angeles; Lumiar Cité, Lisbon; Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin; Fondazione Antonio Ratti, Como, Italy; Prefix Institute for Contemporary Art, Toronto, and the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. In addition, her work has been featured in group exhibitions at the following institutions: Whitney Museum, New Museum, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Hammer Museum, and Museum of Contemporary Art, both in Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna; Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville; Museum der Moderner, Salzburg , and many others.

In 2014, Duke University Press published Other Planes of There: Selected Writings.

Ongoing Becomings, a survey exhibition of 20 years of her work was organized in 2009 by the Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne; in 2010, Endless Dreams and Time-Based Streams, a survey exhibition highlighting her time-based work was produced in the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. In 2008, Le rêve de l’artiste et du spectateur, a retrospective of Green’s films took place at the Jeu de Paume, in Paris.

Other selected solo exhibitions venues include the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich; Portikus, Frankfurt; Centro Cultural de Bélem, Lisbon; Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; Vienna Secession; Stichting de Appel, Amsterdam & the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Green’s work has been included in many group exhibitions; selected venues include Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst und Medien (KM–) in Graz, Austria; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; MACBA, Barcelona; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; International Center of Photography, New York & Louisiana Museum of Art, Copenhagen; her work has also been presented at the Whitney, Venice, Johannesburg, Kwangju, Berlin, Sevilla, Manifesta & Istanbul Biennials, as well as in Documenta 11.

In spring 2014, she completed one phase of her ongoing Cinematic Migrations project, a two-year collaboration with John Akomfrah, OBE, and Lina Gopaul of Smoking Dogs Films, with a symposium.

Her books include:

• Other Planes of There: Selected Writings (2014)
• Endless Dreams and Time-Based Streams (2010)
• Ongoing Becomings (2009)
• Negotiations in the Contact Zone (2003)
• Between and Including (2001)
• Shadows and Signals (2000)
• Artist/Author: Contemporary Artists’ Books
• Certain Miscellanies: Some Documents (1996)
• After the Ten Thousand Things (1994)
• Camino Road (1994)
• World Tour (1993)

Green has published essays and fictions in Transition, October, Frieze, Texte zur Kunst, Spex, Multitudes, Sarai Reader, and Collapse, among other magazines and journals. Her essays, as well as essays about her work, have also appeared in an assortment of international cultural and scholarly books.

Green has been a Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna (1997-2002); a Distinguished Artist/Professor at the University of California Santa Barbara (2003-2005), and Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor at the San Francisco Art Institute (2005-2011). She is also a guest faculty at the Maumaus School of Visual Arts in Lisbon since 2000, as well as of the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of Art since 1991, where she was Director of its Studio program in 1996-1997.

Links

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Embrace of the Serpent
August 15th, 2019

Embrace of the Serpent
Thursday, August 15th, 2019 / 7:00pm
Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center


2015 / 125 minutes / Spanish with English subtitles / Black and White/Color
Directed by: Ciro Guerra
Print supplied by: the Oscilloscope

Please join Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center as we present a year-long series entitled Post-Colonialisms: World Cinema and Human Consequence. We continue with Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent [2015].

Ticket Information: $8 general, $6 students & seniors, $5 members


Event Sponsors:


341 Delaware Ave, Buffalo, NY 14202


Trailer

Synopsis

courtesy of press kit:

At once blistering and poetic, the ravages of colonialism cast a dark shadow over the South American landscape in Embrace of the Serpent, the third feature by Ciro Guerra. Filmed in stunning black-and-white, Serpent centers on Karamakate, an Amazonian shaman and the last survivor of his people, and the two scientists who, over the course of 40 years, build a friendship with him. The film was inspired by the real-life journals of two explorers (Theodor Koch-Grünberg and Richard Evans Schultes) who traveled through the Colombian Amazon during the last century in search of the sacred and difficult-to-find psychedelic Yakruna plant.

Director Statement

courtesy of press kit:

Whenever I looked at a map of my country,
I was overwhelmed by great uncertainty.
Half of it was an unknown territory, a green sea, of which I knew nothing.
The Amazon, that unfathomable land, which we foolishly reduce to simple concepts. Coke, drugs, Indians, rivers, war.
Is there really nothing more out there?
Is there not a culture, a history?
Is there not a soul that transcends?
The explorers taught me otherwise.
Those men who left everything, who risked everything, to tell us about a world
we could not imagine.
Those who made first contact,
During one of the most vicious
holocausts man has ever seen.
Can man, through science and art, transcend brutality? Some men did.
The explorers have told their story.
The natives haven’t.
This is it.
A land the size of a whole continent, yet untold. Unseen by our own cinema.
That Amazon is lost now.
In the cinema, it can live again.

Director Bio

“Losing all the preconceptions that I had about storytelling, about the world, you know, and learning to see the world from a different perspective. It sounds romantic, but it’s not an easy process at all.”

courtesy of press kit:

Ciro Guerra was born on Río de Oro (Cesar, Colombia) in 1981 and studied film and television at the National University of Colombia. At the age of 21, after directing four multi-award-winning short films, he wrote and directed LA SOMBRA DEL CAMINANTE (THE WANDERING SHADOWS), his feature directorial debut, which won awards at the San Sebastian, Toulouse, Mar de Plata, Trieste, Havana, Quito, Cartagena, Santiago, and Warsaw film festivals, and was selected for 60 more, including Tribeca, Locarno, Seoul, Pesaro, Seattle, Hamburg, Kolkata, Rio de Janeiro, Istanbul, and Guadalajara.

His second feature film, LOS VIAJES DEL VIENTO (THE WIND JOURNEYS), was part of the Official Selection – Un Certain Regard of the Cannes Film Festival in 2009. It was released in 17 countries and selected by 90 festivals, including Toronto, Rotterdam, San Sebastián, Hong Kong, Jerusalem, and London, receiving different awards in Cannes, Santa Bárbara, Málaga, Santiago, Bogotá, and Cartagena. It was recently selected in a national critic’s poll as one of the 10 most important Colombian films.

All of Guerra’s feature films to date have been chosen to represent Colombia in the Academy Awards®.

Links

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Jauja
September 19th, 2019

Jauja
Thursday, September 19th, 2019 / 7:00pm
Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center


2014 / 109 minutes / Spanish/Danish with English subtitles / Color
Directed by: Lisandro Alonso
Print supplied by: the The Cinema Guild

Please join Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center as we present a year-long series entitled Post-Colonialisms: World Cinema and Human Consequence. We finish with Lisandro Alonso’s critically-acclaimed Jauja [2014].

Ticket Information: $8 general, $6 students & seniors, $5 members


Event Sponsors:


341 Delaware Ave, Buffalo, NY 14202


Synopsis

courtesy of press kit:

An astonishingly beautiful Western starring Viggo Mortensen, Jauja (pronounced how-ha) begins in a remote outpost in Patagonia during the “Conquest of the Desert” in the late 1800s. Captain Gunnar Dinesen has come from Denmark with his fifteen year-old daughter to take an engineering job with the Argentine army. Being the only female in the area, Ingeborg creates quite a stir among the men. She falls in love with a young soldier, and one night they run away together. When Dinesen realizes what has happened, he decides to venture into enemy territory, against his men’s wishes, to find the young couple. Featuring a superb performance from Mortensen, Jauja is the story of a man’s desperate search for his daughter, a solitary quest that takes him to a place beyond time, where the past vanishes and the future has no meaning.

The Legend:
The Ancient Ones said that ‘Jauja’ was a fabled city of riches and happiness. Many expeditions tried to find this place. With time, the legend grew disproportionately. People were undoubtedly exaggerating, as they usually do. The only thing that is known for certain is that all who tried to find this earthly paradise got lost on the way.

Director/Producer Statement

courtesy of press kit:

Director Statement:

A few years back I received an email telling me that a close friend had been assassinated in a land far away from her place of birth. She loved to write and to talk about films, a bit too much at times. In any case, I was strongly disturbed and shocked by what had happened to her and I began to think of this story. Following her advice, I have devoted more space to words here, and to my own desires. Oddly enough, I feel that this film has come to me and taken its unreal form as a way of helping me to grasp the world and the time we live in, how we vanish in order to inexplicably return, in utterly mysterious ways.


Producer Statement:

When my friend from Boedo, the Argentine poet Fabián Casas, told me in 2011 that he was going to collaborate on a movie project with Lisandro Alonso, I was intrigued. I’d briefly spoken with Lisandro in Toronto a few years earlier, and was familiar with his work, having especially liked “Los muertos”. When we met again, on the set of Ana Piterbarg’s “Todos tenemos un plan”, he told me he wanted to shoot a story set in the 19th century on the Argentine frontier. He said he wanted me to play a Dane who is in the country with his fifteen year-old daughter, working for the military during its genocidal war against the aboriginal population.

It took a lot of patience and hard work by a relatively small but fiercely loyal crew to complete Lisandro Alonso’s “Jauja”, and this collaborative experience has been one of the most satisfying I’ve ever been involved in. We have ended up with a movie that is as Danish as it is Argentine; not an easy thing to do! Fabián and I both admire Lisandro’s creative impulses, and have striven to live up to his philosophy of story-telling in our work on “Jauja”. Lisandro’s is a process that constantly seeks distillation, gently but stubbornly insisting on the intrinsic, essential truth of any given moment. It is one thing to want to achieve this sort of “clean” aesthetic, and another to be able to convey it with grace and originality. Directors like Lisandro, who can truly move us with the subtlety and unmistakable authenticity of their story-telling, do not come along very often. I am proud to have been witness to an important creative step forward for this director, and part of the team that produced what surely will be one of the most special viewing experiences at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

Director Bio

“If tomorrow I have to quit filmmaking, I will. I’m not going to sell my house for a project, that’s for sure. If I have to go back and work on my family’s farm, fine. I don’t have any problem with it. But I would cry a lot.”

courtesy of Festival Scope:

Born in Buenos Aires in 1975, Lisandro Alonso studied at the Universidad del Cine (FUC)and co-directed in 1995 with Catriel Vildosola his first short film DOS EN LA VERDERA (1995). After working as assistant sound engineer in many short films and a few features and as assistant director of Nicolas Sarquis for his film SOBRE LA TIERRA, he made his first feature film, LA LIBERTAD (2001), which was screened at Cannes (Un Certain Regard). In 2003, he founded 4L, a production company based in Buenos Aires, to produce his own films. LOS MUERTOS (2004), FANTASMA (2006) and his latest feature film JAUJA (2014) were also invited to Cannes.

Links

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